Night Qualification

Any holder of a Private Pilot Licence or those students training towards the PPL may undertake additional training for the issue of a Night Qualification which enables the holder to fly in visual meteorological conditions (fair weather) under instrument flight rules at night time.

Before you begin a Night Qualification, what are the requirements?

The only requirement to undertake night training is that the person is a holder of a Private Pilot Licence or is undergoing training towards a Private Pilot Licence and has completed 25 hours dual instruction.

 

What will I, and what am I required to do during the night qualification training?

During your night training you will be required to complete a minimum of 5 hours under the supervision of a qualified night instructor, of which 3 hours must be dual training, with at least 1 hour of navigation training. The solo requirement for this qualification is 5 take-offs and 5 full-stop landings.

During this 5 hours of training you will complete a number of ground briefings about all aspects of night flying including manoeuvring on the ground during darkness. It may take a short while for you to become used to flying at night as the visual perspective for most students is very different from daytime flying. A usual night course will begin with a 1 hour lesson to help you become accustomed to night flying this usually concludes with a number of circuits. Flights after this first one will consist of navigation exercises and circuits until the student is of a suitable standard to fly solo.

Once the required hours and requirements are met, your instructor will sign and stamp all the appropriate paperwork allowing you to apply for your night qualification, there is now Licensing Skills Test or ground examination involved with this qualification.

 

So do I have to renew this qualification?

A night qualification is valid for life. Once it is granted there is no need for revalidation or renewal, however to carry a passenger at night you must comply with the 90-day-rule (3 take-offs and landings in the proceeding 90 days) of which one landing must have been at night time.